Books

  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home1/thomasd8/public_html/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_style_default::options() should be compatible with views_object::options() in /home1/thomasd8/public_html/sites/all/modules/contrib/views/plugins/views_plugin_style_default.inc on line 0.

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie

Downton Abbey fans will enjoy visiting (or revisiting) this classic Agatha Christie murder mystery. Written one year after the current season of Downton takes place, in 1926, this book is set in a small English village with all the usual characters of British mystery fiction – the sly butler, the gossip, the housemaids, and the upper crust young people being forced into an arranged marriage. The story is narrated by the local Dr. Sheppard, a neighbor of Hercule Poirot’s, and a friend of the murder victim.

Succubus Blues by Richelle Mead

Paranormal fans who are tired of reading about vampires and werewolves will enjoy this genre-blending tale of the adventures of a Seattle succubus. (Although vampires make an appearance, they’re relegated to the background.) This is Mead’s first book in a six-part series featuring the immortal Georgina Kincaid, the reluctant corruptor of men’s souls. Mead effortlessly combines urban fantasy, horror, mystery, and romance and makes Georgina a sympathetic figure, even though her job is to seduce and suck the life essence from her conquests.

H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald

Macdonald’s life is in ruins - her father has just died. Some deep part of her is trying to rebuild itself and its model is standing right there on her fist: a goshawk she names Mabel. The hawk is everything she wants to be: solitary, self-possessed, free from grief, and numb to the hurts of human life. And yet, Mabel also helps her to remember what happiness feels like. This poignant memoir describes a poetic transformation. Coming to see her own hawk for who she really is, Macdonald comes to see herself more clearly too.

The Dew Breaker by Edwidge Danticat

An enforcer for the brutal Duvalier regime in Haiti settles in New York City and reinvents himself as a simple barber, hiding in plain sight within the Haitian émigré community and raising a daughter who has no clue about her father’s brutal acts. In this book of linked stories, Danticat moves between 1960s Haiti and contemporary New York, and among a variety of characters who survived the mayhem of “Baby Doc” Duvalier, showing how brutality and violence haunt both victims and perpetrators and asking the question: is true redemption possible?

Hottest Books of 2015

See what was borrowed the most last year here at the Thomas Crane Public Library. We've gone through all the logs. Here are the most popular ficiton and non-fiction books last year, here in Quincy. Check out this page for details about your favorite genres and subject areas.

Fiction

The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro

Set in England of some 1,500 years ago, Axl and Beatrice, an elderly couple who love each other deeply and care for each other as best they can, have reached the age when their memories have become unreliable, when names, faces and even events slip away. But the problems with memory and event are not just theirs; all the people in their community appear to be having the same difficulties. There is a mist that takes memories: good memories and bad, lost children, old rancors and wounds. Memories are valuable; they make us who we are.

Mrs. Engels by Gavin McCrea

Based on the real-life Lizzie Burns, Irish rebel and helpmeet to philospher Frederick Engels, Mrs. Engels is a fascinating work of historical fiction. Gavin McCrea gives life to this little-known historical figure, portraying how an illiterate cotton mill worker became an influential figure in Engels’ and Karl Marx’s political circle. Lizzie’s wit and intelligence serve her well as she works her way up from the mills of Manchester to London society, and readers will enjoy Lizzie’s wry observations and no-nonsense voice in this first-person narrative.

Alys, Always by Harriet Lane

On a dark and stormy night, Frances Thorpe encounters a one-car accident and exchanges a few words with the trapped and unseen driver before she dies. When Frances later discovers that the driver is Alys Kyte, wife of the famous author, Lawrence Kyte, she carefully turns this unplanned encounter into an opportunity to change her future.  Reminiscent of Ruth Rendell or Margaret Yorke, this psychologically acute debut novel is imbued with subtle unease as Frances worms her way into the Kyte family and the glamorous world they inhabit.

Leviathan Wakes by James S. A. Corey

Caught the buzz yet about the new Syfy show The Expanse? It kicked off last night with a bang and is based on this great book. Corey is the pen name of fantasy author Daniel Abraham and Ty Franck, George R. R. Martin’s assistant (of Game of Thrones fame).

The Wright brothers by David G. McCullough

It’s hard to imagine looking up into the sky and not seeing an aircraft speeding to some unknown destination. But a little over a century ago the only things in the sky were clouds, birds, and the occasional balloon. On a December day on the Outer Banks  of North Carolina two bicycle mechanics from Dayton, Ohio changed all that with the flight of the first heavier-than-air, powered machine carrying a pilot. This is Orville and Wilbur (and sister, Katherine) Wright’s story as only two-time Pulitzer prize winning David McCullough can tell it.

Syndicate content

© 2011 Thomas Crane Public Library

Developed by Isovera, Inc.