Books

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Killing and Dying by Adrian Tomine

The tales told in this graphic novel area about as far from flying super heroes as you can get. A regular contributor to the New Yorker, a magazine he has created more than a dozen covers for, Tomine has collected six stories in this book. Using a variety of artistic techniques, multiple perspectives are explored, from a middle-aged guy trying to define himself beyond his landscaping job, to a college-aged woman with an uncanny resemblance to a porn star. These are not New Yorker cartoons. Some parts are funny but others are quite dramatic.

RIP William Trevor

Irish writer William Trevor died this earlier this week at the age of 88. Trevor explored his characters—and their often unfortunate fates—with great compassion, limning the contours of human loneliness and sadness. Many of his short stories and novels are set in his native Ireland, some contemporary and some historical. Others are set in England, where he lived for most of his adult life.

Pre-Election Fact Checking

Unless you've been living under a rock the last several months, you know that this coming Tuesday is Election Day. If you're still unsure whether or not that statement from one of the presidential candidates is true or not, let us help - it's not too late to get the facts! The following is a list of the most reputable, non-partisan fact-checking organizations working overtime to keep the public informed this election cycle.

Moriarty by Anthony Horowitz

If you like Sherlock Holmes stories, picking up this book is a no-brainer. This is the second novel by Anthony Horowitz to get Arthur Conan Doyle’s estate’s approval and the plot and writing style definitely fit in well with the established Holmes canon. While Holmes and Watson do not make appearances in this one, that’s okay - we have a couple of stand-ins who fill in quite nicely. The mystery itself is exciting, each action-packed encounter with the bad guys artfully builds up to the surprising climax.

The Hairdresser of Harare by Tendai Huchu

Struggling single mom Vimbai is the best hairdresser in Zimbabwe’s capital until the handsome and charismatic Dumisani shows up at her salon. The young man has a lot of secrets.

The Dogs of Littlefield by Suzanne Berne

Littlefield, MA: #6 on the Wall Street Journal's "Best Places to Live". A suburban idyll. More psychologists per capita than any other town in the USA. Which, no doubt, contributes to the plethora of stable families and overachieving children. Well-attended band concerts. Beautiful Victorian homes on manicured lawns. If happiness had an address it would be here. Then the first dog is poisoned. Shock. Disbelief. And, as more dogs die, cracks begin to appear in Littlefield's civilized veneer. Residents begin to suspect one another.

Esther’s Star Won’t Go Out

On Wednesday, August 3, we are collaborating with Esther Earl’s family to celebrate Esther Day. Esther Day was started in 2010 to celebrate love for family and friends by telling those who we are close to that we love them, even if it is sometimes difficult to say out loud.

Adult Summer Reading Suggested Titles

If you're looking for book suggestions as you're participating in our Adult Summer Reading program, we can help. Below are lists, separated by geographic area and linked to our catalog so it's easy to request them. But, this is only a suggested reading list - enter any book into our logging tool for a chance to win one of six prize baskets.

The suggested reading lists are:

Reading Around the World

Thomas Crane Public Library: your gateway to amazing stories from around the globe!

Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty by Charles Leerhsen

When the Baseball Hall of Fame opened in 1936 Ty Cobb was the first inductee. Baseball royalty. By far the most thrilling player of his era many argue that he was the greatest to play the game. He was also one of its most controversial. Noted for fights both on and off the field, an aggressive style (he attempted to “create a mental hazard” for the opposition), he was a fierce and fiery competitor. And after his death in 1961 something strange happened to his reputation: he became a virulent racist, who hated women and children, and was in turn hated by his peers.

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