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biography/memoir

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Life Among the Savages by Shirley Jackson

Abruptly evicted from their apartment in the city, the author and her husband scramble to find a home for their growing family out in the country. A departure from “The Lottery,” the dystopian short story for which Jackson is best known, Life Among the Savages tells the true story of Jackson and her patient, somewhat oblivious, husband raising four young children in rural Vermont.

George Marshall : A Biography by Debi and Irwin Unger with Stanley Hirshson

While Patton, Eisenhower, Bradley, Montgomery, MacArthur, Nimitz and a host of field commanders were waging war across the world, George C. Marshall was running it, overseeing logistics, training and personnel as Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army from 1939-1945. Marshall’s achievements were summed up by an admiring Harry Truman: “he won the war.” Churchill called him the “Organizer of Victory.” But in this fascinating and fair biography Marshall’s legacy is critically reviewed and found wanting. Even the “Marshall Plan,” for which he won the Nobel Peace Prize, was not authored by him.

Elephant Company by Vicki Constantine Croke

The Inspiring Story of an Unlikely Hero and the Animals Who Helped Him Save lives in World War II.

Mornings on Horseback by David McCullough

The story of an extraordinary family, a vanished way of life, and the unique child who became Theodore Roosevelt

The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee by Marja Mills

The world of Atticus Finch, a small town Southern lawyer, is part of literary history. In 1960, Harper Lee published the Pulitzer Prize-winning To Kill a Mockingbird, still one of the best-loved American books and required reading in 70 percent of U.S. school systems. By 1965 she had refused interviews and never wrote another book, a one-hit wonder, until it was just announced on February 3 that a second book, a pre-quel will be published this coming summer.

Brother, I'm Dying by Edwidge Danticat

Brothers Joseph and Mira began life 12 years apart in a remote hilltop village in Haiti when the country was still occupied by U.S. Marines. They died a few months apart in 2004 in Miami and New York, one a prisoner of the U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security and the other a naturalized U.S. citizen.

Rocks: My Life In and Out of Aerosmith by Joe Perry

Who doesn't love Joe Perry? If you are among the few, this book should win you over. Along with typical rock and roll memoir topics like drugs, infighting, and being manipulated by management, there are interesting insights into the events that formed him. He comes across as a being grateful to have made a career out of playing the guitar and as a genuine family man who not only loves and appreciates his wife and kids but the rest of his family as well.

Margaret Fuller: A New American life by Megan Marshall

She counted among her best friends the literary giants of the nineteenth century yet few people really know her story. Megan Marshall’s suburb biography brings her story to a new audience who will enjoy discovering the life of this strong vibrant woman living in a paternal and masculine world yet forging her own path. Margaret was H. Waldo Emerson’s confidante, Thoreau’s editor and the first female war correspondent for the New York Tribune. She experienced firsthand the Italian revolution of 1848-49 while becoming romantically involved with an Italian soldier.

Dear Abigail by Diane Jacobs

The intimate lives and revolutionary ideas of Abigail Adams and her two remarkable sisters. We all know about “Remember the ladies” Abigail. This book delves into the other strong women in her world, sisters Mary Cranch and Elizabeth Shaw Peabody. Because the Adams were often abroad, much of what we know about Abigail and her sisters and the events happening in Boston are through their letters.

Charles Dickens in Love by Robert Garnett

Charles Dickens was the “celebrity” of the Victorian era. Well loved for his family oriented stories and novels, his life was a combination of romantic subterfuge, financial constraints and familial duty. This biography highlights the three intensely romantic interests in his life other than his wife, the mother of his ten children. The most interesting relationship with Ellen Tiernan, twenty seven years his junior, lasts until his death.

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© 2011 Thomas Crane Public Library

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