general fiction

  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home4/thomasd8/public_html/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_style_default::options() should be compatible with views_object::options() in /home4/thomasd8/public_html/sites/all/modules/contrib/views/plugins/views_plugin_style_default.inc on line 24.

Bad Marie by Marcy Dermansky

What a fun little diversion! Marie is 30, recently released from jail, and in love with a toddler. She is only slightly more mature than her new charge and thinks it perfectly fine to bath together while she enjoys some stolen whiskey. That’s not the only thing she steals in this quick celebration of good things happening to bad people. It’s refreshing how good you can feel routing for her as she makes one bad decision after another. Like watching a french-language train-wreck, in black and white. This book took no time to read and was a blast. Every dream of ditching it all?

Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson

Major Ernest Pettigrew (retired) is the quintessential English gentleman. Sardonic, decorous, urbane, and endearingly opinionated. He has settled into a widower’s life when his brother’s death ignites an unexpected friendship with Mrs. Jasmina Ali, a Pakistani shopkeeper in their quiet village. A shared interest in literature and the loss of spouses creates something more than friendship. But the Edgecombe St. Mary’s inhabitants are scandalized by the harsh clash between culture and tradition. Hilarity, tentative romance and gentle wisdom ensue. A wondrous tale.

One Day by David Nicholls

It's 1988 and Dexter Mayhew and Emma Morley have only just met. But after only one day together, they cannot stop thinking about one another. Over twenty years, snapshots of that relationship are revealed on the same day--July 15th--of each year. Dex and Em face squabbles and fights, hopes and missed opportunities, laughter and tears. And as the true meaning of this one crucial day is revealed, they must come to grips with the nature of love and life itself.

Dog Gone, Back Soon by Nick Trout

I first met local veterinarian Dr. Trout when he helped me diagnose a dear greyhound I had rescued. When I came across this, his fifth book, I knew I had to give it a chance - he was a great help in a tough time and I figured that his writing must be pretty good to sustain this many books. I was very pleasantly surprised. This novel is about a man who has returned to his home-town in rural Vermont to take over his recently deceased father’s veterinary practice.

Redeployment by Phil Klay

Demythologizing the complications and vicissitudes of war requires a deft eloquence and brutal honesty. Klay’s powerful first-person stories explore the brutality and faith, guilt and doubt, commitment and fear and the ever present attempt to create meaning from the fog of our recent Middle East conflicts. Winner of the 2014 National Book Award for fiction.

Bad Teeth by Dustin Long

Who is Jigme Drolma? Perhaps the Tibetan David Foster Wallace? Perhaps a fraud? Follow young literary artists across Brooklyn, Bloomington, Berkeley, and Bakersfield as they trip through life, art, love, and SOFA. What is SOFA? Think Occupy, but not as well defined. This novel is often quite funny, definitely proud of its geek edges, and a fun way to spend a few hours. Don’t read it for plot - there’s not a ton. Its never even entirely clear who the main characters are, but its a fun ride for sure.

Some Luck by Jane Smiley

It’s 1920 and Rosanna and Walter Langdon are just starting their lives as a young farm family in Iowa, Walter just returned from the European battlefield and Rosanna determined to be the perfect farm wife. The years pass one by one while babies are born, crops are harvested, tractors replace workhorses and the family lives within the arc of history (drought, Depression, another World War, the Red Scare). This is a satisfying family saga that is billed as the first of a trilogy, and you will want to keep reading about this extended clan of characters you’ve come to know and care about.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

We first meet Marie-Laure and Werner as youngsters in pre-war France and Germany. Marie Laure lives with her father, master locksmith at the Museum of Natural History in Paris, and loses her sight at age six. Werner and his sister are growing up with limited prospects in a poor orphanage in the coal mining town where their parents died.

The Last Summer of the Camperdowns by Elizabeth Kelly

In the summer of her 13th year, during the Watergate hearings of 1972, Riddle Camperdown stumbles upon the aftermath of a crime.  A discovery she chooses to keep from her politician father "Camp" and her caustic, retired movie star mother Greer.  In due time Riddle becomes involved with the family of a teenager who has seemingly disappeared and discovers several more familial secrets.

The Lost Diaries of Iris Weed by Janice Law

“Lars” Larson is a middle-aged college English professor with a wife and daughter—and a wandering eye for pretty coeds. Iris Weed is one of those coeds, whose apparent romantic disinterest in Lars inspires him to obsess about her to the point of stalking and spying on her to find out who her boyfriend is. Things come to a head one night during an argument in Lars’ car, leading Iris to storm off and leave one of her diaries behind. The next morning, she turns up brutally murdered in a parking lot.

Syndicate content

© 2011 Thomas Crane Public Library

Developed by Isovera, Inc.