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science fiction/fantasy

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The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber

Sci-Fi dystopian fiction meets missionary tale. Peter once was lost, a drunk and a thief headed for an early death. Then he fell in love with a devout nurse and the two of them started a new life spreading the good word. The novel opens as Peter is just about to head millions of miles away from home to the next chapter in his life. A multinational corporation (and even that description seems too small, given their inter-planetary reach) has recruited him to work on a planet they are active upon.

The Martian by Andy Weir

Abandoned for dead by the rest of his crew after a horrific storm forces them to evacuate the planet, Mark Watney’s challenges are immense. Facing starvation, loneliness, broken machinery, an unforgiving environment, human error and no way to contact earth this botanist/engineer nevertheless is not willing to surrender. Will his ingenuity be enough to overcome the impossible odds he faces? A terrific adventure/survival tale. Check Our Catalog

Lock In by John Scalzi

Sometime in the near future a virus has infected thousands of people around the world and completely severed their ability to control their bodies. Being of sound mind these people (Holdens) are literally locked inside their human form. The virus had no respect for class or status and many very wealthy people were locked in. They were able to harness political power to subsidize rapid advances in technology that now enable people locked in their bodies to navigate the physical world by controlling very advanced robots - as well as habitating in expansive virtual worlds.

Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler

No one writes dystopian science fiction quite like Octavia Butler. Captivating and terrifyingly real, Parable of the Sower tells the tale of young Lauren Olamina, an empath who feels and experiences the pain of others around her. Forced to flee her home in Southern California, Lauren finds an America where anarchy and violence have completely taken over as a result of unattended environmental and economic crises.

The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

This is a fabulous tale! It starts in the mid-1980’s in the English countryside when 15-year-old Holly Sykes storms away from home over her first-love - an older boy who does her wrong so fast its barely even mentionable. Earlier in Holly’s life she heard voices and had visits from what other’s chalked up to an imaginary friend. But it was never imaginary for Holly, and she is quite sane. The novel skips forward and around the globe, introducing several other interesting characters, all of whom have compelling stories of their own.

The Passage by Justin Cronin

A project to bioengineer a race of super warriors who can master any skill in moments and heal from the most catastrophic wounds produces mutant “virals” that wipe out most of the human population in short order. One hundred years later a small group of survivors at the end of their resources decide to place their hope in a young girl who can so something unusual: communicate with the “virals.” Meticulously plotted, full of a host of well-drawn and empathetic characters, and enough plot twists to keep one guessing to the pause at the end . . . eagerly anticipating the second installment.

The Circle by Dave Eggers

Picture this: a multinational corporation specializing in internet-related services and products has been devouring all competitors for years. 90% of the the world’s searches go through this company. Without competitors this will only increase. Control the flow of information and you control everything including what anyone sees and knows. The company can bury information. It can ruin any person. No one can rise up against it because it controls all the information and access to it. What happens when the company controls all searches and has full access to all data about every person?

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

A man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. He wanders into the farmstead of a friend from his youth, follows a path to a duck pond--which may be the ocean--and, begins to remember “everything.”  His friend’s grandmother may be as old as the world. His nanny may be a monster. The pennies in his piggy bank may be gold.

The Human Division by John Scalzi

Earth has recently discovered that the Colonial Union has become humanity’s home for super-soldiers and colonists. Earth is not amused and is exploring the possibility of aligning with the Conclave, a vast collection of alien races - which could spell disaster for the CU. Super soldier Harry Wilson and diplomatic corp officer Hart Schmidt do the heavy lifting in a fast-paced narrative full of wonderfully snarky characters.

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© 2011 Thomas Crane Public Library

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