Books

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Jeeves and the Wedding Bells by Sebastian Faulks

Jeeves and the Wedding Bells is a brand-new (yes, really!) novel featuring beloved characters Bertie Wooster and his butler Jeeves. Sebastian Faulks has captured the spirit of P.G. Wodehouse's most famous characters, and the witty dialogue and hilarious situations Bertie and Jeeves find themselves in are absolutely true to Wodehouse form. I was a bit skeptical that Faulks would be able to pull this novel off, but, incredibly, it fits right in with the Wodehouse collection of comedic perfection. It will please old fans and should attract new readers to these characters.

Everybody Has Everything by Kristen Onstad

After years of trying to have a baby, James and Ana unexpectedly become instant parents of a toddler whose parents have been killed (the dad) and possibly fatally injured (the mom) in a car accident. James dives into fathering while Ana keeps her distance, and their lives, identities and even their formerly happy marriage are put to the test. Canadian writer Onstad creates a story that rises far above chick lit, with evocative prose, fully realized characters, and a conclusion that is both unpredictable and true-to-life.

The Absent One by Jussi Adler-Olsen

Copenhagen’s Department Q, led by detective Carl Morck, specializes in very cold cases: this one is 20 years cold with a confessed perpetrator already doing time in prison. The crime: the brutal murder of two teenage siblings in a summer cottage. The suspects: rich and successful members of Denmark’s elite who met in private school and formed a secret rampaging gang inspired by the movie “A Clockwork Orange”. This Nordic crime series has it all—interesting characters, twisty suspense, and plenty of quirky humor.

The People of Forever Are Not Afraid by Shani Boianjiu

Yael, Avishag and Lea are typical teens coming of age in an atypical environment—a country in a state of continual hostility with its neighbors and ever-present fear of attacks on civilians. It is modern Israel. The three friends are drafted into the Israeli Defense Force and fulfill their two years of service training shooters, monitoring border checkpoints, flirting with boys, remembering their girlhoods in a tiny village on the Lebanese border, and wondering about the future.

Swimming Home by Deborah Levy

This deliciously short novel recounts the experiences of a war correspondent, her philandering poet husband, their teenage daughter, and two family friends on holiday in the hills above Nice. Just as they arrive they discover a young women, naked, in the swimming pool. For reasons not immediately obvious, the stranger is invited to stay with them in the villa. The characters in this story have interesting dimensions and their complicated relationships with each are deftly explored. Shortlisted for the Man Booker prize in 2012.

The Extinction Club by Jeffrey Moore

This funny, dark, literary crime novel, marketed as a "neo-noir thriller" is loads of fun. The protaginst, Nile Nightingale, is on the run and hiding out in Quebec's remote Laurentian mountains when he witnesses a bloody christmas package dropped into a frozen bog. Inside the package he discovers a teenage animal rights activist who he gradually nurses back to health while poachers and corrupt accomplices circle.

Sisterland by Curtis Sittenfeld

Twin sisters Kate and Violet have taken separate paths in life: Kate is happily married with two small children; Violet is a bit of a drifter still unattached and making a living as a medium. Then Violet publicly predicts that a major earthquake will hit St. Louis MO on a specific date, just after a smaller earthquake hits the area. Years ago, Kate “disabled” her own psychic abilities by choice and now must confront her sister’s sudden celebrity status, her scientist husband’s skepticism, and her unexpected attraction to a fellow stay-at-home dad.

Sparta by Roxana Robinson

It’s 2006 and Conrad Farrell has just returned home after four years in Iraq as an officer in the Marines. While his parents and siblings welcome him back warmly, and his girlfriend welcomes him more cautiously, Conrad finds that re-entering the world he left behind is nothing like he thought it would be. As he corresponds with men he served with—some still at war and some back home--flashes back on painful scenes from Iraq, he finds himself confused, angry, and frustrated, with little help forthcoming from the VA.

Instructions for a Heatwave by Maggie O’Farrell

A loving but dysfunctional Irish English family converges at the family homestead in London during the legendary British heatwave of 1976 when the dad goes out for the morning paper and never returns.  As abandoned wife Gretta worries about her husband’s whereabouts, son Michael Francis (two kids, failing marriage) shows up to help, and favorite daughter Monica (failed marriage, shaky second marriage with two dreadful stepdaughters) also drops by.

Heft by Liz Moore

Arthur Opp weights 550 pounds and hasn't left his Brooklyn Brownstone in many years. Kel Keller lives 20 miles north on the Hudson and is the poor kid in the rich school dreaming about a future as a professional baseball player. They are connected by Kel's mother, a former student of Arthur's. There are a lot of sad stories in this engaging novel, but it is not a sad book. Liz Moore adeptly spins the tale of the commonalities that bring disparate people together (and includes a serious dose of addiciton to keep it from getting too light).

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© 2011 Thomas Crane Public Library

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