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Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson

Major Ernest Pettigrew (retired) is the quintessential English gentleman. Sardonic, decorous, urbane, and endearingly opinionated. He has settled into a widower’s life when his brother’s death ignites an unexpected friendship with Mrs. Jasmina Ali, a Pakistani shopkeeper in their quiet village. A shared interest in literature and the loss of spouses creates something more than friendship. But the Edgecombe St. Mary’s inhabitants are scandalized by the harsh clash between culture and tradition. Hilarity, tentative romance and gentle wisdom ensue. A wondrous tale.

The Best American Travel Writing, 2014 edited by Paul Theroux

Need a break but don’t have the time or the money to get away? This is the perfect escape for you - two dozen tales that span the globe. Arranged alphabetically by author’s last name, I thought at first that this would be a very strange way to organize things, but it ended up working fabulously well. There was one piece that didn’t work very well for me, but it was short, and followed by a piece that completely redeemed the volume.

Don’t Ever Get Old by Daniel Friedman

Pushing 90, shaky on his pins, and irascible as ever (not in an endearing way), retired Memphis cop Baruch "Buck" Shatz discovers that the Nazi who tortured him and got away after the war is still alive. Not only that, he may be sitting on a stash of gold stolen from the German Reich. Whether he suffers from a God complex or is just a thorough misanthrope, Buck is the funniest detective I've run into in a long time, and his refusal to concede to old age kept me laughing all the way through. This book was nominated for an Edgar Award for Best First Novel.

Deep: Freediving, Renegade Science, and What the Ocean Tells Us About Ourselves by James Nestor

Beginning with the almost sado-masochistic endeavors of those engaged in competitive freediving and ending in the abyssal depths of the hadal zone five miles below the surface and crawling with organisms that have never seen the light of day, Nestor conducts a fascinating underwater travelogue. He swims with sharks. But he also swims with school bus sized sperm whales who, we learn, don’t use those powerful jaws to catch prey but emit jackhammer “clicks” that stun their food. A fascinating read.

The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee by Marja Mills

The world of Atticus Finch, a small town Southern lawyer, is part of literary history. In 1960, Harper Lee published the Pulitzer Prize-winning To Kill a Mockingbird, still one of the best-loved American books and required reading in 70 percent of U.S. school systems. By 1965 she had refused interviews and never wrote another book, a one-hit wonder, until it was just announced on February 3 that a second book, a pre-quel will be published this coming summer.

Brother, I'm Dying by Edwidge Danticat

Brothers Joseph and Mira began life 12 years apart in a remote hilltop village in Haiti when the country was still occupied by U.S. Marines. They died a few months apart in 2004 in Miami and New York, one a prisoner of the U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security and the other a naturalized U.S. citizen.

The Martian by Andy Weir

Abandoned for dead by the rest of his crew after a horrific storm forces them to evacuate the planet, Mark Watney’s challenges are immense. Facing starvation, loneliness, broken machinery, an unforgiving environment, human error and no way to contact earth this botanist/engineer nevertheless is not willing to surrender. Will his ingenuity be enough to overcome the impossible odds he faces? A terrific adventure/survival tale. Check Our Catalog

Rocks: My Life In and Out of Aerosmith by Joe Perry

Who doesn't love Joe Perry? If you are among the few, this book should win you over. Along with typical rock and roll memoir topics like drugs, infighting, and being manipulated by management, there are interesting insights into the events that formed him. He comes across as a being grateful to have made a career out of playing the guitar and as a genuine family man who not only loves and appreciates his wife and kids but the rest of his family as well.

One Day by David Nicholls

It's 1988 and Dexter Mayhew and Emma Morley have only just met. But after only one day together, they cannot stop thinking about one another. Over twenty years, snapshots of that relationship are revealed on the same day--July 15th--of each year. Dex and Em face squabbles and fights, hopes and missed opportunities, laughter and tears. And as the true meaning of this one crucial day is revealed, they must come to grips with the nature of love and life itself.

Liberty’s Torch : The Great Adventure to Build the Statue of Liberty by Elizabeth Mitchell

America’s most recognizable icon was originally referred to as the “Bartholdi Statue.” Over time the sculptor’s name disappeared from popular memory. The fascinating story of the Statue of Liberty is the tale of potent whimsy, self-promotional hustle, dogged determination and French sculptor Auguste Bartholdi’s reach for his own version of immortality. Check our catalog

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