• warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home1/thomasd8/public_html/modules/taxonomy/ on line 33.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_style_default::options() should be compatible with views_object::options() in /home1/thomasd8/public_html/sites/all/modules/contrib/views/plugins/ on line 24.

Crafty Bastards: Beer in New England from the Mayflower to Modern Day by Lauren Clark

Local journalist and beer brewer Lauren Clark has delivered a well researched and witty book about the history of beer and the explosive emergence of craft beer brewing in the New England area. Starting with the Pilgrims first landing in Plymouth, Lauren explores the rich history and vital importance that beer had on the first settlers of America. With scarce resources, the early settlers of our nation had to get creative, using corn, spruce tree branches, pumpkins (actual pumpkins, not our modern nutmeg laced “pumpkin” beers), and molasses, as ingredients.

The Passage by Justin Cronin

A project to bioengineer a race of super warriors who can master any skill in moments and heal from the most catastrophic wounds produces mutant “virals” that wipe out most of the human population in short order. One hundred years later a small group of survivors at the end of their resources decide to place their hope in a young girl who can so something unusual: communicate with the “virals.” Meticulously plotted, full of a host of well-drawn and empathetic characters, and enough plot twists to keep one guessing to the pause at the end . . . eagerly anticipating the second installment.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

We first meet Marie-Laure and Werner as youngsters in pre-war France and Germany. Marie Laure lives with her father, master locksmith at the Museum of Natural History in Paris, and loses her sight at age six. Werner and his sister are growing up with limited prospects in a poor orphanage in the coal mining town where their parents died.

The Widow's War by Sally Gunning

Lyddie Berry is a strong and independent thinking woman. She needs that strength when her husband dies because life as a widow in colonial America is almost unimaginable by today's standards. Besides her grief, she must deal with the fact that the house she shared with her husband for twenty years, her property, and her rights are now controlled by her nearest male relative. That man is her overbearing and thoroughly insensitive son-in-law.

The Last Summer of the Camperdowns by Elizabeth Kelly

In the summer of her 13th year, during the Watergate hearings of 1972, Riddle Camperdown stumbles upon the aftermath of a crime.  A discovery she chooses to keep from her politician father "Camp" and her caustic, retired movie star mother Greer.  In due time Riddle becomes involved with the family of a teenager who has seemingly disappeared and discovers several more familial secrets.

The Lost Diaries of Iris Weed by Janice Law

“Lars” Larson is a middle-aged college English professor with a wife and daughter—and a wandering eye for pretty coeds. Iris Weed is one of those coeds, whose apparent romantic disinterest in Lars inspires him to obsess about her to the point of stalking and spying on her to find out who her boyfriend is. Things come to a head one night during an argument in Lars’ car, leading Iris to storm off and leave one of her diaries behind. The next morning, she turns up brutally murdered in a parking lot.

Confessions of the World’s Best Father by Dave Engledow

I chose this because I thought, “Aha, someone’s finally written my story!” Then I discovered it was by and about--horrors-- A Pretender to the Throne! A hilarious pictorial parody of a clueless (but outrageously clever) father and his adorable daughter. I laughed so hard that I, well, a washing machine was involved. Check Our Catalog

The Circle by Dave Eggers

Picture this: a multinational corporation specializing in internet-related services and products has been devouring all competitors for years. 90% of the the world’s searches go through this company. Without competitors this will only increase. Control the flow of information and you control everything including what anyone sees and knows. The company can bury information. It can ruin any person. No one can rise up against it because it controls all the information and access to it. What happens when the company controls all searches and has full access to all data about every person?

The Flame Throwers by Rachel Kushner

Reno is an artist living in NYC in the 70’s. She loves speed, especially fast motorcycles and downhill skiing. Always an outsider, she flirts on the fringes of several fascinating scenes, develops a long-term relationship with an older, more established artist/son of an Italian Motorcompany magnate, and finds herself mixed up with the Red Brigades, the radical movement that threw Italy into chaos in the late 1970s. Kushner has crafted a very tangible protagonist - I felt like I really knew her and can empathize with the challenges she faces. There are no tidy answers at the end.

Death and the Olive Grove by Marco Vichi

Little girls keep showing up dead--with bite marks on their bellies--in 1960s-era Florence, and world-weary 50-something Inspector Bordelli is tasked with finding their killer.

Syndicate content

© 2011 Thomas Crane Public Library

Developed by Isovera, Inc.