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Rocks: My Life In and Out of Aerosmith by Joe Perry

Who doesn't love Joe Perry? If you are among the few, this book should win you over. Along with typical rock and roll memoir topics like drugs, infighting, and being manipulated by management, there are interesting insights into the events that formed him. He comes across as a being grateful to have made a career out of playing the guitar and as a genuine family man who not only loves and appreciates his wife and kids but the rest of his family as well.

One Day by David Nicholls

It's 1988 and Dexter Mayhew and Emma Morley have only just met. But after only one day together, they cannot stop thinking about one another. Over twenty years, snapshots of that relationship are revealed on the same day--July 15th--of each year. Dex and Em face squabbles and fights, hopes and missed opportunities, laughter and tears. And as the true meaning of this one crucial day is revealed, they must come to grips with the nature of love and life itself.

Liberty’s Torch : The Great Adventure to Build the Statue of Liberty by Elizabeth Mitchell

America’s most recognizable icon was originally referred to as the “Bartholdi Statue.” Over time the sculptor’s name disappeared from popular memory. The fascinating story of the Statue of Liberty is the tale of potent whimsy, self-promotional hustle, dogged determination and French sculptor Auguste Bartholdi’s reach for his own version of immortality. Check our catalog

Robert Stone (1937-2015)

Adventurer, war correspondent and award-winning novelist Robert Stone died on Saturday. His second novel, Dog Soldiers, won a National Book Award and was adapted into the movie "Who'll Stop the Rain" in 1978. Other significant works include A Flag for Sunrise, Outerbridge Reach, and Damascus Gate. Never read one of his books? Try borrowing one from the library and see what makes his work worth reading! Check Our Catalog

Lock In by John Scalzi

Sometime in the near future a virus has infected thousands of people around the world and completely severed their ability to control their bodies. Being of sound mind these people (Holdens) are literally locked inside their human form. The virus had no respect for class or status and many very wealthy people were locked in. They were able to harness political power to subsidize rapid advances in technology that now enable people locked in their bodies to navigate the physical world by controlling very advanced robots - as well as habitating in expansive virtual worlds.

Dog Gone, Back Soon by Nick Trout

I first met local veterinarian Dr. Trout when he helped me diagnose a dear greyhound I had rescued. When I came across this, his fifth book, I knew I had to give it a chance - he was a great help in a tough time and I figured that his writing must be pretty good to sustain this many books. I was very pleasantly surprised. This novel is about a man who has returned to his home-town in rural Vermont to take over his recently deceased father’s veterinary practice.

Angel Baby by Richard Lange

Luz made the biggest mistake of her life when she left her one-year-old daughter in L.A. with her aunt and threw her lot in with a Mexican drug lord in Tijuana. Now married to Mexican drug lord #2, she is captive to her husband and her drug habit. After a year of careful planning, she manages to escape both and make a run for her “angel baby” back in L.A. Almost immediately, her husband is on her trail via a murderous paid thug/convict and a thoroughly corrupt U.S. border patrolman. Her only hope is Malone, a drunken and dissolute drifter who smuggles illegals across the border for money.

Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson

If I could, I would make this book required reading for everyone of voting age in this country. In this age of mass-incarceration, with truly horrifying and mind-numbing statistics documenting our floundering with the administration of justice, this book provides powerful hope for how we can move forward. With incredibly engaging stories from the frontline of the struggle, the founder of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama recounts his experiences as a lawyer working to assist those desperately in need, reflecting on his pursuit of the ideal of compassion in American justice.

Redeployment by Phil Klay

Demythologizing the complications and vicissitudes of war requires a deft eloquence and brutal honesty. Klay’s powerful first-person stories explore the brutality and faith, guilt and doubt, commitment and fear and the ever present attempt to create meaning from the fog of our recent Middle East conflicts. Winner of the 2014 National Book Award for fiction.

Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler

No one writes dystopian science fiction quite like Octavia Butler. Captivating and terrifyingly real, Parable of the Sower tells the tale of young Lauren Olamina, an empath who feels and experiences the pain of others around her. Forced to flee her home in Southern California, Lauren finds an America where anarchy and violence have completely taken over as a result of unattended environmental and economic crises.

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