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Ink and Bone by Rachel Caine

The first novel in Caine’s new series, called The Great Library, starts out with some lovely world building. Set in the not-so-distant future, the premise is that the ancient Library at Alexandria was never destroyed and grew to be the most powerful - and oppressive - force in the world. In this world, personal ownership of books is illegal. So when book smuggler Jess Brightwell becomes a Librarian, things get a bit awkward with his family.

Amulet, Vol. 1: The Stonekeeper by Kazu Kibuishi

The prologue, guys and gals, starts the book with a bang or in this case, a dive off a cliff. One tragic car accident takes the life of Em and Navin's father. Two years go by when their mom decides to move the family to this supposedly haunted house in the middle of nowhere that once belonged to their great-grandfather. Their first night there Em hears a noise. Scared, her mom goes to check it out. She expects to find a raccoon or some other thing. What she doesn't expect to find is this globby alien creature that swallows her and takes her away.

H2O by Virginia Bergin

While post-apocalyptic books are a dime a dozen these days, mid-apocalpse books aren't quite so common. Originally published in the UK as The Rain, this book shows just how fast things can go downhill when a disaster strikes the entire planet. A deadly bacteria renders the rain itself deadly and contaminates every open water source. Even a single tiny drop spells an agonizing death. And there is no treatment or cure. Boiling doesn't kill it and neither does chlorine. People panic, traps are set, there are raids on supermarkets and the homes of those who died early.

The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

Even though this book is not being published until October 6, I got my hands on an advance copy and was so excited. First, if you haven’t read the Chaos Walking series, I strongly encurage you to find time ASAP and get on it. Ness is really good at writing characters that I can engage with.

Top anticipated July reads

Summer time - the perfect moment to compile an impossibly long list of books to read, right? I agreed to help read in a read-a-thon of To Kill A Mockingbird, the day before Harper Lee's new novel (Go Set a Watchman) is released (let me know if you'd like to pariticpate too, or just come to the read-a-thon).

The Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E. Smith

In this light-hearted romance, Lucy and Owen meet in an elevator that gets stuck during a city-wide blackout. Over the course of one night they form a bond that both time and distance can't break. Just days after that night, Lucy moves across the ocean to Scotland and Owen sets off on a cross-country journey with his father to recover from his mother's sudden death. Despite their distance, Lucy and Owen try to keep in touch in the form of postcards, but as time goes on they lose touch. However, both Lucy and Owen find that in spite of their separation neither can move on from the other.

MassBook Awards Must-Read Middle Reader/Young Adult Literature for 2015

book jacketsTeens read! Just as picture books have been highlighted for young readers this year, 2015 marks the first time the Massachusetts Center for the Book has published a list of must-read "middle reader/young adult" books that were either written by a Massachusetts author or that had subject matter related to this great state. Here is the list with links so you can reserve your next favorite right now!

Monkey Wars by Richard Kurti

Papina is a young female rhesus monkey living peacefully with her family in an old cemetary in Kolkata (India) when a band of langur monkeys savagely attack. Mico is a young, priveledged male langur when his clan kicks out the rhesus, and he witnesses attrocities that give him good reason to question the authority of his clan's leaders. Full of intrigue, some light romance, betrayals, and family loyalty, this is a captivating fable.

The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black

Massachusetts’ own bestselling fantasy writer has brought another captivating story to life. I will not be surprised if this is made into a movie someday soon. Deep fantasy and an unconvential love trianble are the cornerstone of this tale. Hazel is the lead character, and she is a girl character who rocks! Growing up she always played the knight and I can not imagine her as a damsel in distress. Her brother Ben is blessed with a musical talent that, like all blessings, brings nearly as many problems as it solves.

Red Rising by Pierce Brown

It’s the end of the world on Earth, and humans toil to terraform Mars and make it their new home planet. That is, humans that are of the Red class. Life on Mars isn’t the same for everyone, and people are divided into socio-economic classes that include the ruling Gold, powerful Obsidians,  and the mining Red. Part Hunger Games and part Game of Thrones, Red Rising focuses on a young man named Darrow, a Red who strives for something more than the mining life of his people.

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