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Category Archive for 'Symphonies'

“[H]e just lets the music speak for itself, the Minnesota’s trombones cutting off phrases like anvils of death, the cyclical appearance of the tritone interval in the work emerging naturally in the precise work of the Minnesotans (who for all the talk of Finnish musical miracles are at least the equals of their Lahti counterparts) [...]

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“Claudio Abbado’s live album of Robert Schumann’s music with the Orchestra Mozart is a curious diversion from the ensemble’s ongoing series of Mozart recordings, though it shows a willingness to explore other repertoire that is less predictable for them….[T]he symphony and the overtures are rendered with plenty of emotion and the musicians display commitment and [...]

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“Always one of the most popular of Dmitry Shostakovich’s symphonies, the Symphony No. 7 in C major was premiered in 1942….The orchestra gives a committed and sure-footed performance, and Petrenko’s rapport with his musicians goes a long way toward explaining the spontaneity and energy of their playing. Naxos’ recording is clean and spacious, with a [...]

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“One of the most innovative and imaginative composers of the 20th century, Benjamin Britten was a master of the orchestral genre. This extensive collection charts the development of Britten’s orchestral voice and features some of his greatest works, including the evocative Four Sea Interludes, the powerful and majestic Sinfonia da Requiem, the virtuosic Young Person’s [...]

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“Gergiev’s Tchaikovsky is stunning in its immediacy, passion, and vitality, and the somewhat naïve early symphonies benefit greatly from his intensity and the abundant energy of the London Symphony Orchestra.” –All Music Guide Check Our Catalog

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“Best known for his operas, he nonetheless created works in a remarkable range of genres: chamber music, orchestral scores, piercing song cycles and choral works….As a pianist and conductor, he understood the visceral joys of performance.” –The Boston Globe Check Our Catalog

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Herbert Von Karajan: Legacy

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Gustav Mahler: Symphony No. 9

“Dudamel and Los Angeles give this symphony a coherent and compelling performance…where the conductor’s pacing and phrasing carry the work to its inevitable goal…. It is refreshing to hear the piece played with real melodic sweep, and to understand that Dudamel’s vision of the symphony is organic, developed, intensely lyrical, and mature.” –All Music Guide [...]

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“To give listeners a clear idea of this critically acclaimed conductor’s range and versatility, short pieces and movements from larger works have been selected from seven CDs to highlight his repertoire on Discoveries… Conducting the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela, the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, the Berlin Philharmonic, and the Vienna Philharmonic, he shows his [...]

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“Recorded between 1975 and 1979 with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and grouped here with the Violin Concerto and various famous tone poems, such as Finlandia, The Swan of Tuonela, and Tapiola, Davis’ set is still a viable contender against other packages on the market, and listeners who want lucid interpretations will be hard pressed to [...]

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Jean Sibelius: Symphonies 1-4

“[Paavo Berglund] made everything he did sound like Shakespeare, whether it was Beethoven, Brahms, Smetana, or Rachmaninov. But it was the conducting of Sibelius that he revolutionized…. The sound of his Sibelius is hard but not hard-edged; it’s all forest murmurs and oscillating universes. In his hands, the symphonies don’t develop, in the usual Western-music [...]

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“[Paavo Berglund] recorded the complete symphonies three times; the middle set, done between 1984 and 1987 with the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra, makes for an inexpensive and readily available introduction…. Symphony No. 5 is a particular treat; Sibelius had swans in mind, and Berglund’s just keep getting whiter and whiter. As for ‘Tapiola,’ it’s a conversation [...]

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“There’s a lot to like in this recording of Shostakovich’s Second and Fifteenth symphonies with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Choir and Orchestra led by their young conductor, Vasily Petrenko. …This album is part of a complete cycle of Shostakovich’s symphonies, and…you may well be intrigued enough to check out other releases in the series.” –All [...]

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Arvo Pärt: Symphony No. 4

“Arvo Pärt has demonstrated a voracious musical curiosity and daring experimental spirit throughout his career that has allowed him to move beyond his secured place as Estonia’s premiere composer to become perhaps the best-known choral and sacred music scorist of his time.” –All Music Guide Check Our Catalog

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“Szymanowski’s unique brand of expressive, lyric modernism has found many admirers in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Though his earliest music is perhaps too closely allied to that of his childhood idol Chopin to fully stand on its own, his later work synthesizes the stylistic characteristics of a wide range of composers into a highly [...]

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Check Our Catalog “Few can deny Bernstein’s lasting importance in promoting Mahler’s cause, for in the 1960s and early ’70s there was only a handful of conductors of comparable magnitude who specialized in this music, and his work…certainly caught the attention of the world.” –All Music Guide

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Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 5

Check Our Catalog “This 2009 release of Anton Bruckner’s “Symphony No. 5 in B flat major”…delivers a remarkably clear and cogent reading of Bruckner’s most skillfully wrought symphony, along with a moving account of how Zander came to conduct this work so late in his career. Zander’s grasp of the music is secure throughout, and [...]

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Check Our Catalog “It works its magic on a deep emotional level: with the unsurpassed Berlin strings surging through the rich, plangent harmonies of the final Adagio, it is the kind of music-making that leaves you feeling drained, even distraught by the end – as it should.”–Daily Telegraph

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Check Our Catalog Celebrated as the musical poet of the English landscape, Vaughan Williams was also a visionary composer of enormous range: from the pastoral lyricism of The Lark Ascending and the still melancholy of Silent Noon to the chilly grandeur of the Sinfonia Antartica and the noisy ceremonial of All people that on earth [...]

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