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Tag Archive 'Indie Pop'

Sia: 1000 Forms of Fear

“1000 Forms of Fear is an appealing balance of Sia the artiste and Sia the chart-topping songwriter. To say it’s her most accessible album yet doesn’t diminish it or her previous albums; instead, it’s the sound of Furler owning her success.” –All Music Guide Check Our Catalog

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Lykke Li: I Never Learn

“I Never Learn utilizes the simplest tools of confessional songwriting: uneasily strummed acoustic guitars and resonant piano chords enlarged for texture and dramatic flair, like they’re appearing from behind a just-raised curtain, or from a radio as you sing to yourself….We’re used to breakup albums that assume you just want to crawl into a hole [...]

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Arc Iris: Arc Iris

“Arc Iris is the band singer, composer, arranger, and multi-instrumentalist Jocie Adams established after leaving the Low Anthem. This self-titled debut album is nearly impossible to categorize. Though this bracing, fresh, nearly seamless meld of cabaret, folk traditions, country, rock, classical, cabaret, and jazz is eclectic and ranging, it’s accessible to listeners of many stripes….Arc [...]

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Foster the People: Supermodel

“Supermodel is full of infectious, dance-oriented music that touches upon ’80s-influenced dance-rock… soulful psychedelia… and melodic acoustic rock… in equal measure….[I]f Torches scratched the surface of twenty-something angst, then Supermodel takes that exploration a few steps deeper, revealing a more introspective, enigmatic, world-weary tone.” –All Music Guide Check Our Catalog

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Broken Bells: After the Disco

“As always in Broken Bells’ world, there’s a fine line between bittersweet and bummed out; while these aren’t the easiest moods to make appealing, Burton and Mercer succeed….Given Burton and Mercer’s pedigrees, it’s hard not to want more from Broken Bells, but After the Disco’s strongest moments suggest that their music is coming into focus.” [...]

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St. Vincent: St. Vincent

“Annie Clark began recording St. Vincent almost immediately after she finished touring in support of Love This Giant, her inspired collaboration with David Byrne. It’s not hard to hear the influence that album had on these songs; Love This Giant’s literal and figurative brassiness gave Clark’s witty yet thoughtful approach more sass without sacrificing any [...]

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Dum Dum Girls: Too True

“Dee Dee and her crew are determined to test the self-set boundaries of their sound, and even if it won’t always work the attempt will always be interesting. If they keep making records this emotionally powerful, hook-filled, and easy to listen to as this, their future is very, very dark and promising.” –All Music Guide [...]

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Los Campesinos!: No Blues

“When Los Campesinos! burst onto the indie scene in the late 2000s, they were a rambunctious (more or less) half-male/half-female crew who madly ran through their songs like they were chasing rainbow-puking unicorns. The results, like the song ‘You! Me! Dancing!,’ or the album Hold on Now, Youngster…, were wild, unpredictable, and the best kind [...]

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“Swapping out the sonic and mental clutter for a host of centered, unconfused rock tunes is a curveball move, for sure, but the end product is the most memorable, lasting, and relatable albums in Of Montreal’s extensive catalog, and easily one of the best.” –All Music Guide Check Our Catalog

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Beachwood Sparks: Desert Skies

“Prior to the release of Beachwood Sparks’ 2000 self-titled Sub Pop debut album, the California neo-hippie country-rock outfit had already produced an album’s worth of material. Recorded in true DIY style in a small converted one-car garage known as the Space Shed, this would-be debut, titled here as Desert Skies, featured the band’s earlier six [...]

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Air Traffic Controller: Nordo

“A band’s bio shouldn’t color one’s reception of the music too much, but you’ll be forgiven for grinning ear to ear while listening to the Bleu-produced second record from this Boston six-piece, imagining songwriter Dave Munro working in the US Navy as an actual air traffic controller and dreaming up brilliant little pop ditties while [...]

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Camera Obscura: Desire Lines

“Glaswegian group Camera Obscura have dialed in their approach to indie pop perfection over the course of their lengthy run….Desire Lines has a… feel of a band bounding out of the gates with a renewed creative energy. Here it results in some of their best and most confident work to date.” –All Music Guide Check [...]

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Shout Out Louds: Optica

“Thanks to the production, the overall strength of the songs, and the quietly intense energy the bandmembers put into their performances (not forgetting Adam Olenius’ typically impressive lead vocals), Optica is a welcome return to form and solidifies Shout Out Louds’ position as one of the best indie pop bands of their era.” –All Music [...]

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The Postal Service: Give Up

“Ben Gibbard’s famously bittersweet vocals and sharp, sensitive lyrics imbue Give Up with more emotional heft than you might expect from a synth pop album, especially one by a side project from musicians as busy as Tamborello and Gibbard are. The album exploits the contrast between the cool, clean synths and Gibbard’s all-too-human voice to [...]

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She & Him: Volume 3

“Always looking backward to the sunny sounds of the ’60s, She & Him often feel like a band out of time, a pair of pop dreamers born too late to be a part of the musical scene they’ve painstakingly crafted a pastiche of with their third album, Volume 3…. Three albums (plus a Christmas record) [...]

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Future Bible Heroes: Partygoing

“It’s been ten years since the last Future Bible Heroes album, but for those in the know, it’s hardly felt like a drought, as the group is merely a re-skinned version of ultra-prolific songwriter Stephin Merritt’s myriad other outlets, which include Magnetic Fields, Gothic Archies, and the 6ths….[F]ew songwriters can capture the bleak comedy of [...]

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“An eight-member ensemble, the Mowgli’s fill their songs with a panoply of instruments from guitars and keyboards to horns and melodica, and deliver each song’s chorus with a crowd of heterogeneous voices, shouting to the hilt as if the album was less a studio-crafted effort and more of a flashmob recorded on CD…. [A]n optimistic [...]

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“The Music is You: A Tribute to John Denver gathers up an oddball team of contemporary artists with a shared love for the late Muppets/Rocky Mountains loving singer/songwriter, and lets them strut and fret their hours upon the stage by paying homage to a rich assortment of Denver classics.” –All Music Guide Check Our Catalog

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“[T]hey know how to turn a phrase, plant a seed, and build a bridge and tear it back down again without losing the audience in the process. Simply put, they can bend the relative simplicity of traditional folk music to their collective wills, which is exactly what they do on their sophomore outing, Babel.” –All [...]

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DIIV: Oshin

“Oshin was released by Captured Tracks and bears all the hallmarks of that label’s quintessential sound: jangly guitars, winsome vocals, cavernous reverb, and an overall murky, underwater production aesthetic. Oshin is a pleasant listen, especially for anyone partial to Beach Fossils or the Captured Tracks sound in general.” –All Music Guide Check Our Catalog

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